Social Inequities Highlighted by the Prolonged Pandemic: Expanding Sick Leave

Authors

  • Beth M. Rauhaus Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi
  • Andrew F. Johnson Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20899/jpna.7.1.154-163

Abstract

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, a number of federal responses have been enacted in the United States to address the public health crisis, as well as the economic fallout and inequalities caused by the pandemic. A key feature globally in fighting the pandemic has been paid sick leave, as other nations have been successful in flattening the curve of infections by enacting emergency paid sick leave. This work explores best practices globally of paid sick leave used during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using the theoretical framework of punctuated equilibrium, this work spotlights the increased need to address paid sick leave in the United States. This work contributes further to understanding how policymaking in a federal system of government occurs during times of crisis.

Author Biographies

Beth M. Rauhaus , Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi

Beth M. Rauhaus is an Associate Professor of Public Administration and MPA Program Coordinator in the Department of Social Sciences at Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi. Her research uses public policy and administration theories to explore issues of gender, diversity, and social equity in the public sector. 

Andrew F. Johnson , Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi

Andrew F. Johnson is a faculty member in the College of Business at Texas A&M University‚ÄďCorpus Christi since 2015. Dr. Johnson routinely teaches strategic management, multinational management, and a graduate course titled business, government and society. He has published in areas of corporate political activity, political ideology in organizations, and social change.¬†

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Published

2021-04-01

Issue

Section

Social Equity Section